Tools & Supplies

Painting has to be done with safety in mind. Regardless, if you are touching up your home office or repainting your exterior, there are specific safety pieces of equipment that you need to invest in for best results. Avoid taking unnecessary health risks by starting the job being prepared. Painting Hazards While painting may seem fairly creative and exciting, there are definite health risks that one needs to consider. Dangerous bodily harm can occur if the correct precautions are not followed. Paint consists of noxious chemicals. These are harmful if inhaled or ingested. Significant irritation can happen if the paint gets into your eyes or has prolonged contact with unprotected skin. Headaches and respiratory problems can happen due to toxic paint fumes too. Flammable Products Products used for cleaning oil-based paints and stains and primers are paint thinner, an extremely flammable chemical. It can burn people if it makes contact with your skin. Working At Heights Ladder safety is a number one concern for interior and exterior painting jobs. Exterior jobs commonly work at heights and painters need to have safety harnesses and proper gear. Balancing paint and working on a slope can be difficult to navigate, especially in extreme heat or rain. Understanding the potential risks associated with painting can help you prepare. Having the right tools and team on hand can make all of the difference when it comes to your safety. Take the following risks into account that come with various painting methods. Roller Painting: This kind of painting is mainly used for ceilings and walls. It is easy to get paint accidentally in your eyes. Painters can expect sore muscles or the risk of pulling a muscle due to working at this unnatural position for extended periods of time. Brush Painting: This is the most traditional kind of painting. This method is popular for painting wood fences, door frames, window sills, etc. Skin spills are common as paints splashing in the eyes. It may lead to headaches or breathing problems if solvent-based or oil-based paint is used. Ventilation Issues: Painting indoors can create a build-up of toxic fumes. Having the windows and doors open during the spring, summer, or fall months is ideal. If it is cold where you live during winter, perhaps avoid painting until you can safely offer better ventilation. Painting At Heights: Any motion you are completing while up in the air is immediately more dangerous than working on the ground. Painters have to remain mindful while on the stepladder or scaffolding. Proper safety harnesses need to be worn at all times since a fall could be fatal. Spray Painting: This is common for large exterior surfaces and extended square footage as in lobbies. Painters need to be wary of getting random paint spray particles in their eyes. These fumes and particles can be a respiratory irritant. Proper PPE needs to be worn with eye goggles, a respirator and protective clothing. Prepping and Clean-Up Risks The tasks involved in prepping paint locations and cleaning up afterward can pose additional risks. Wooden surfaces require sanding prior to painting. If the painter doesn’t wear goggles or a respirator, they may suffer from dust in their eyes and respiratory system. If you are sanding wood, old paint, or metal, this can have negative consequences. Paint thinner is a common harsh chemical used for cleaning brushes and other items. It can easily ignite if exposed to a heater or a flame. Avoid using without proper ventilation as it is toxic. PAINTING PPE To keep yourself safe during any residential or commercial painting project, you need the right personal protective equipment (PPE): The right personal protective equipment or PPE will keep you safe during your next commercial or residential painting job. Always wear gloves: Use leather or cloth ones while sanding and prepping. Use solvent-resistant gloves when cleaning up with solvents and paint thinner. Impermeable gloves are ideal for oil and water-based paint. Protective eyewear: can shield your peepers from splashes of paint or thinners. These are especially valuable when you are spray painting. Coveralls: Protect your skin and your clothes with cotton coveralls. Paint will irritate your skin. Hardhat: When working at heights, it is vital to protect your noggin. This safety precaution can save your life if you fall. If you are in a construction atmosphere, it can protect your head from falling debris and other items. Shoe Covers: Keep your footwear free from paint and protect the floors by covering your shoes. Be careful not to slip. Paint Masks: A particulate respirator or dusk mask is essential during sanding tasks. If you will be using noxious chemicals, you should invest in a respiratory mask when using the roller or paintbrush. If you are painting outdoors, take care to use a drop cloth to avoid spilling chemicals in the environment. Use a respirator when spray painting to avoid toxic fumes. Fire extinguisher: Keep a fire extinguisher on-site at all times to be ready in the event of a fire. There are flammable materials with the paint thinners and paint that can alight at a moment’s notice. Don’t smoke near the paint. Fall arrest system: A single or double carabineer system can be attached to you and to a railing to help you prevent falling. A harness attaches to you via the legs and torso if you are working at heights or on a dangerous construction site.
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